Easy Peasy Blackcurrant Jam

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So sometimes, things don’t work out quite like you planned. We recently visited our local farmer’s market, which is always a treat. It is full of cute stalls selling local produce and prepared food. Our favourites include the tomato sellers (yes, grown in the UK!) and the goat’s cheese stall. We also never miss an opportunity to visit all of the fruit and vegetable stalls. Not only can you buy local English produce in peak condition, you see things that are completely new as well (to us, anyway) – purple cauliflower, anyone? Or how about some adorable mini plums? While buying said plums, we spotted some blackcurrants and snapped those up, buoyed by a lifelong love of Ribena. Blackcurrants are indigenous to the UK, and it is said contain a rather large amount of Vitamin C, apparently prompting the British government to promote the consumption of these little berries during the rationing of World War II.   We imagined adding them to fruit salads, summer smoothies and yoghurt bowls.

Unfortunately, it was not to be as they were terribly sour. Eh, you win some, you lose some.  We prefer winning. Therefore, when life gives you lemons, make jam!

Blackcurrant jam is an extremely common way of using up a surplus of blackcurrants (although it is also said that 99% of blackcurrants are used in Ribena), but we thought we’d do it our way as a) we’ve had not-very-good luck with making jam in the past; and b) we like easy! So we thought we’d show you our easy peasy blackcurrant jam – a bit sweet, a bit tangy and perfect with some yoghurt/toast/frozen yoghurt/ice cream etc.

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Makes 1 half-pot of jam

1.5 cups blackcurrants
2 tbsp honey (to taste)

  1. Cook the blackcurrants in a small saucepan on a low heat until soft and mushy.
  2. Add the honey and stir to make sure it is dissolved. Feel free to add more honey if it is too tangy for your taste.
  3. If the mixture is dry at this point, you may add about a tablespoon of water.
  4. Boil the mixture until thick and set, To test that it is set, place a spoon in the freezer and add a bit of jam to the frozen spoon. If the mixture wrinkles a bit when you drag your finger through it, or does not run over the spoon, it is set.
  5. Spoon the jam into a small jam jar and refrigerate.

So what do you think? Feel free to share your questions and comments below! We’d love to hear what you have to say.

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